September 24 - October 16

We fed the bees around 11 times. 1 - 1.5 kg of sugar in a 2:1 syrup solution each time. On October 15 we saw little evidence of capped honey in the upped warré box, and the outer combs appeared as thought they could be empty. The middle frames of the nuc contained reasonably large patches o capped brood. On one of those frames we also found a queen cup containing many eggs and on the following frame we saw the queen. On the 16th, With the cooling tempratures, the bees had not taken down any of the feed we had left them on the 15th. At this point we turned the top feeder into a quilt filled with saw dust.

November 13

As there was high amounts of DWV in this yard over the fall, we decided to use an organic mite treatment. As we quickly applied the oxalic acid dribble, we saw a modest, but encouraging number of bees for a colony which has struggled to get going all season. In the warré box we obsevered bees on all but the outer-most combs and in lang nuc adapter box there were two combs of bees. On the other hand, this leaves us concerned that they might not have enough stores for winter despite our efforts to feed them. We added 1.5" spacer box under the quilt and used this space to provide about 2.5 kg of dry sugar on top of newspaper as an emergency food supply.

November 15

As it was getting dark and we were cold the previous day, we came back to give the hive tar paper wrap for winter. The high for the day was around 11 degrees celcius and the bees were flying, and to our surprise even bringing back some pollen:

Mid-November and they are still foragingPhoto by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

 

August 5

Very little comb started in the new box.

IMGP2006Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

The brood frame we seeded was almost all hatched out, with no signs of more laying in this box.

IMGP2000Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

IMGP2002Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Solid amounts of capped brood above in the nuc box adapter.

IMGP2012Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Lots of pollen in the bottom box that we moved up to make it feel more like a brood nest.

IMGP2007Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

August 29

IMGP2170Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Bottom warré had 3.5 combs mostly pollen and another comb just getting started

Top warré - Still one completely undrawn comb. 6 combs well on their way and another started.

Contained mostly nectar.

IMGP2173Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

IMGP2179Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

A few frames with small patches of eggs squeezed in.

IMGP2174Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

We saw the queen down in here.

IMGP2176Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

As it appeared she could use more room to lay we moved the least filled and half started frames from the bottom box up and moved the undrawn frames down.

September 10

IMGP2385Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

The bottom warré 1 comb with pollen and nectar and another empty. 2 combs just started and another half built.

The top warré

IMGP2386Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

had some very yellow comb. From left to right it contained 2 combs of pollen and nectar,

IMGP2387Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

IMGP2388Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

capped brood and lots of pollen,

IMGP2390Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

5 frames of nectar and a little capped honey

IMGP2391Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

We moved up a pollen and nectar frame and one empty comb to try and provide more room to lay.

The nuc had 1 frame with all nectar on it's way to honey

IMGP2393Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

and 3 others about half and half honey and brood.

IMGP2394Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

We spotted the queen up here.

IMGP2395Photo by: Shawn Caza / CC: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

The brood seems minimal, and we can't help but wonder if it's because the queen was comprimised by pesticides before we bought it. The pattern of what brood there is does look a little healthier than that of the other colony we bought from the same breeder which has now lost their queen. They did get started too late in the spring but I would have thought that they have the resources for at least a little more than this by now.